Recovery for Introverts

Pretty much all addiction treatment and recovery is done in groups, which can create quite a barrier.

Introverted people enjoy being around others too, but it takes a lot more energy out of them.  It just doesn’t come naturally.  Whereas, non-introverts can go to group meetings daily (sometimes multiple meetings a day), introverts may want to consider supplementing their recovery with some additional resources.

I’m not saying that they shouldn’t attend any meetings at all, I’m just saying that they likely won’t want to go as frequently.  The usual suggestion for those in early recovery, is 90 meetings in 90 days, which can be a daunting task. The reason why it is so helpful… it helps you keep your recovery first and foremost in your thoughts.  It also helps retrain your thinking, and allows you to build a fellowship with others who will support you.  I think it’s a great suggestion, and I would recommend it to anyone actively seeking recovery, but there are times when this just won’t work.

Introverts are naturally “head types”, which means they spend a lot of time thinking/analyzing/and reflecting.  These are GREAT qualities to have when it comes to recovery!  I find that introverted people really respond well to the science of recovery.  They love to learn and understand about addiction/alcoholism.  Educational materials (books/videos/blogs/meditations/etc…) can help keep recovery at the forefront of their thinking, and they usually love the idea that they can access recovery in this way.

These days, there are so many good apps for recovery.  Here are several of my favorites:

#1 Favorite:  Joe and Charlie.  This is an AA based app that is made up of recordings of “Joe and Charlie” talking about the history of AA and about the 12 steps.  Joe and Charlie are these two old country dudes that got really well known for teaching the steps.  I absolutely love them!!!! (probably because I’m from Tennessee, and I love hearing 2 old country guys tell stories) They have a great way of combining humor and wisdom to really help you understand the 12 step process.  They break it down so simply that you can really start to wrap your head around what AA and the 12 steps are all about.

#2 Favorite:  AA to go:  Like “Joe and Charlie”, this app is also made up of recorded audio files.  Basically, it’s recorded speaker meetings.  These are great.  You can tell from listening to them, that some are more recent, and some are older (in fact, there is even a recording of Bill Wilson talking at a convention).  Recovery Nerds like me think that’s pretty cool!

#3. Favorite: 10th step App:  In case you don’t know, the 10th step is about taking a daily moral inventory. You open the app nightly and answer the questions (these questions really make you dig deep and get honest with yourself).  It will then give you a recovery score % (you have to turn this feature on).  After doing this for a while, you will begin to see what your average score tends to be.  If you see a big drop in your score, this should alert you that you may be in relapse warning signs. It also trains you to be mindful of your thoughts and actions in daily life.

There is also a great online site for recovery meetings called “In The Rooms” https://www.intherooms.com/

This site has meetings for pretty much anything and everything you can think of! Check out the site page https://www.meetings.intherooms.com/meetings/search

To use this site, you just set up a user name and password.  They have all kinds of online recovery resources.

There are also lots of great recovery readings. Here is a link to a good list of recovery reading materials. http://addictionblog.org/treatment/book-reviews/books-to-read-in-addiction-recovery-18-must-haves/

If you are a like to understand things and you want to know the science behind addiction and alcoholism, check out my free video resources!  Get your recovery nerd on here. http://hopeforfamiliesrecoverycenter.com

With all of the resources available, anybody should be able to get a daily dose of recovery.  I would love to hear from you, what recovery resources you love.  You can write to me at amber@hffrc.com.