Hope For Families Recovery Center/Outpatient Drug And Alcohol Treatmet
Hope For Families Recovery Center

136 Milestone Way

Greenville, SC 29615

P) 864-906-2395

F) 864-670-5320

appointments@hffrc.com

To protect the confidentiality of our clients the images used in conjunction to our client testimonials are not images of the actual clients who left these reviews. 

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Joey Porchetta,
Certified Peer Support Specialist

All I wanted in life was purpose

-to bring value and love and enthusiasm into the lives of others. My upbringing gave me the structure and support needed to thrive in life. I got everything I ever needed, and most of what I wanted.
 
 
My family loved me unconditionally, but it became apparent at an early age that I had a hard time loving myself. Loving myself was tough because I compared my insides to people’s outsides, and my insides were never as good as their outsides seemed to be.
 
 
I heard somewhere that non-alcoholics change their behaviors to meet their goals; I did this for the first eighteen years of my life.
I had a deep love and respect for the game of lacrosse and it became my goal to play at the collegiate level. On the lacrosse field was where I felt connected to the present moment. It was the only place I didn’t feel inadequate, less than, not good enough, etc. All my hard work and dedication came to fruition – at around 18 years old I verbally committed to play lacrosse at a small liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
 
 
 
Around that same time, I tried a substance for the first time, a substance that comfortably filled the void inside of myself, a substance that completely derailed the trajectory of my life. 3 years of school went by – it was in those three years that drugs and alcohol became the only goal in my life worth pursuing. I turned 21 in my first treatment center and didn’t decide to change my life until June 23rd, 2017 – a little over four years later.
 
Throughout those 4 or 5 years, anything I placed before my recovery, I lost – I lost a lot of things I loved. My willingness to change was dynamic; it constantly progressed just as frequently as it regressed.  For 5 years I was stuck in a state of ambivalence – was I really a drug addict and alcoholic?
 
The answer was clearly yes, but there’s such a stigma attached to addiction that it became a hard label to willingly accept.  But it’s not about what I’ve lost, it’s about what I’ve learned about myself along the way, it’s about the process. I always liked the saying, “the setback is just the setup for the comeback” - because everybody loves a good comeback story.
 
When I finally embraced who I was, a recovering drug addict and alcoholic, my life started to change. The moment I accepted myself as an addict and alcoholic was the moment I realized I had found purpose in life: to help other sick and suffering addicts and alcoholics to achieve sobriety.
Joey supports addiction counseling by providing peer support for our clients in recovery.  Because he's been through it himself, he's able to give hope and validation to individuals and families as they find their way back.

Joey's Story from Addiction to Hope!